African Center for a green economy (africege)

Africege is an independent non-profit think tank and social innovation hub,
working in East & Southern Africa to promote the transition to new economy.

Africege was founded by a group of emerging sustainability leaders who are
passionate about the future of Africa, and are committed to making a difference.

ABOUT US

Who we are

AFRICEGE is a Think Tank and innovation hub supporting the transition to a new/green economy in east and southern Africa. Through engaging with policymakers, business leaders and academia, Africege is seeking to promote evidence-based policy implementation and the development of appropriate skills for the transition towards a green economy.

What we do

AFRICEGE works to deliver capacity building and networking outcomes with strategic significance for the transition towards a green economy in east and southern Africa. We do this by working closely with individuals, governments, business and civil society in the region to foster collective action for sustainable development.

Our Mission

AFRICEGE aims to provide thought leadership, raise awareness and build capacity to support the transition towards a green economy in east and southern Africa.

Our Vision

Our vision is to inspire a generation of change makers to help Africa transition to a new and just economy that promotes human wellbeing and environmental sustainability.

MEET THE TEAM

Find out a little bit more about our dedicated team members

Our team is comprised of passionate professionals with vast expertise and experience on the issues of resource scarcity, specifically water, energy and food security and the impact of climate change. With our collective experience on these issues we are well placed to catalyze change, and believe strongly that young Africans should be at the forefront in addressing the enormous developmental challenges the continent faces.

Mao A. Amis (PhD, MSc)​
Executive Director​
Dr Amis is the co-founder and Executive Director of AFRICEGE. Prior to founding AFRICEGE, Dr. Amis worked as programme Manager for WWF South Africa, and as strategy consultant on water and climate change. Dr Amis has extensive experience on Green Growth issues in Africa and has consulted and collaborated with various organisations such as IFPRI, the New Economics Foundation (NEF), CORAF, and others. Dr Amis studied at the University of Cape Town, graduating with MSc and PhD in natural resources management. He is a a member of the UN CEO Water Mandate Taskforce, the Western Cape Province Green Economy Taskforce and others.


Malango Mughogho (MSc)
Board Member​
Malango is WWF South Africa’s Programme Manager in Sustainable Business with a focus in the retail and financial sectors. She was recently the project lead for WWF’s 2012 ground-breaking “Navigating Muddy Waters: securing investment returns under carbon and water constraints” Prior to joining WWF, Malango worked for more than 10 years’ in the banking and development finance sectors, with the IFC, the DBSA, ING Barings and Standard Chartered. She holds an MSc in Economics and Finance from Warwick University. Originally hailing from Malawi, she has lived in India, South Africa, Swaziland, the UK and Zimbabwe.


Sepo Hachigonta (PhD, MSc)
Board Member​​
Dr Hachigonta is Director of International Relations at the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa. Prior to joining the NRF, he was climate change programme manager for FANRPAN, a regional Food Security and Agricultural Organisation based in Pretoria. Dr Hachigont has extensive experience in climate change and agriculture research, with a specific focus on the research to policy interface. Dr Hachigonta holds an MSc and a PhD in Environmental Science from the University of Cape Town.


Richard Okou (PhD, MSc)
Research Associate
Dr Okou is our research associate, and an Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Makerere University, Uganda. Richard’s focus is on renewable energy technologies , with a specific interest on issues of improving energy access and the use of low cost energy technologies to improve the livelihoods of impoverished rural communities. Richard holds an MSc in Sustainable energy engineering from KTH Stockholm, and a PhD in renewable energy from the University of Cape Town.


Prof A. B. Sebitosi
Strategic Advisor, sustainable energy solutions
Prof Sebitosi is an NRF rated Researcher and Professor at the Centre for Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies, University of Stellenbosch. He was also Lead Coordinator for energy curriculum development for the masters program of the Pan African University Institute for water and energy. His research interests include rational use of energy, (incorporating energy conservation, renewable energy, and water-energy nexus), energy policy, rural energisation, industrial quality assurance and power quality. Prof holds a PhD from UCT, and is a registered professional Engineer, among other qualifications.


Ms Leisa Perch
Capacity Building Associate
Ms Perch is a Policy Specialist at the World Centre for Sustainable Development (Rio+Centre), Brazil and the focal point for our collaboration with Rio+ Centre. She is an international Development Professional with 15+ years experience in climate change, poverty reduction and gender equality. She has worked extensively in the Caribbean region and on Small Island Developing States. In Africa, she is collaborating with AFRICEGE on green growth capacity building and research, and has worked with the SADC Parliamentary Forum, and FANRPAN in the region.
Ms Perch is a lead author of chapter 13 on poverty, livelihoods and climate change on the forthcoming Intergovernmental panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. She holds an MA from the University of Nottingham and a BA from Keele University.


Ms Lilian Schulze
Communications Associate
Ms Schulze has got a background in international business & development studies (MSc) and freelances doing research, communication, and more in the cultural, social & sustainability space. She’s co-founded the Ubuntu Academy and has been been part of Attane’s evolution from early on. At heart she is a people’s person who is thrives on diversity and collaboration. Lilian connects, conceptualises and does. Lilian is a Berlin-born, half Taiwanese who now calls Cape Town home in Cape Town.


Nonceba Febana (BA (Hons))​
Community Liaison: South Africa
Ms Nonceba Febana is our Community Liaison Manager in South Africa, responsible for our grassroots initiatives. She is currently researching the role of urban agriculture in building nutritional security in low income households in Cape Town. Nonceba Febana holds an Honours Degree in Geography from the University of Western Cape


Imran Ejotre (MSc)​
Community Liaison: Uganda
Imran Ejotre manages Africege’s field programmes and acts as community liaison in Uganda. He is also a lecturer in the department of Biological Sciences, Islamic University in Uganda (IUIU). Imran is the representative of the university to the eastern Uganda Regional Climate Change Forum and vice chair of the natural resources committee of the forum. He holds Master of Science in Zoology and Bachelor of Science in Education (Botany, Zoology and Chemistry) from IUIU, and currently enrolled for a PhD at Bucknell University, USA


Nkulumo Zinyengere
Research Associate
Nkulumo Zinyengere is a PhD candidate in Environmental Science at the University of Cape Town, with the Climate System Analysis Group. He has vast experience in climate change impacts and adaptation projects in southern Africa, having conducted research in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Malawi and Swaziland for a number of international development organisations. Nkulumo holds an M Sc in Agricultural Meteorology from the University of Zimbabwe.

PROGRAMMES

Our focus is in three key strategic areas

AFRICEGE works to deliver capacity building and networking outcomes with strategic significance for the transition towards a green economy in east and southern Africa. We do this by working closely with individuals, governments, business and civil society in the region to foster collective action for sustainable development. With our collective expertise and experience in water, energy, food security and climate change, we are afforded the opportunity to catalyze change in the transition towards a green economy.

Our focus is in three key strategic areas as described below:

GREEN ECONOMY INNOVATIONS

We build regional networks of change makers who are committed and are courageous enough to pursue their ideas of bringing positive change to Africa and making the dream of a green economy a reality. Through our networks we create a platform for change makers to incubate their ideas, get peer support and share experiences.

We help organize and activate local economies by supporting new economy innovations that result in community upliftment and in promoting models of the economy that promote human wellbeing and environmental sustainability with broyeur de branches.

This incubation program targets marginalized communities, women and unemployed youth by empowering them to take advantage of the opportunities presented by the green economy in their communities. The nature of the interventions will vary depending on the area of operations, at present the focus is on building sustainable agribusiness, fighting energy poverty and promoting access to sustainable water supplies for rural communities. We are also creating an online platform (www.attane.org) to showcase new economy innovations that promote local economies, equity and social justice.

Green innovations for socio-economic development

Water scarcity and availability poses major risk to socio-economic development and the environment. To the private sector, water scarcity translates directly into a reputational, regulatory, and financial risk, with major implications on their operations and supply chains. As a result, many companies have started to adopted innovations to manage their water risks. However, there is little understanding on the efficacy of such interventions, and whether the benefits of better water management extend beyond the specific business operations. This project is exploring the nature of green innovations that have been taken up by the private sector, and the extend to which they benefit the broader landscape as a whole.

Green business incubation and capacity building

Africege is currently piloting a green business incubation programme with the goal of activating grassroots green economy enterprises. This project is currently being implemented in Cape Town, with support from the DOEN Foundation and the New Economics Foundation. During the course of the next two years, 20 green enterprises will be supported both throung in-kind and financial support. The initiative is focused on supporting green enterprises that ascribe to new economy principles, that include innovative ownership arrangements, new forms of distribution and a focus on grassroots.

Sustainable energy solutions for low cost housing

As part of our innovation hub, we are piloting a scheme that promotes sustainable energy solutions for low cost housing schemes in South Africa. We have established a workshop that trains local community members to manufacture and install tubular skylight units. Our goal is to install 1000 skylight units per annum, in low cost housing in South Africa to enable impoverished households to enjoy the benefits of natural lighting. We are currently seeking private sector support to sponsor the skylight units to enable us reach more households in South Africa. In future this programme will expand to other sustainable energy solutions that complement the day lighting solution that we offer.

CAPACITY BUILDING

We are passionate about helping leaders broaden their spheres of influence, and one way of achieving that is through building technical competence to bring about change.

The concept of a green economy is poorly understood across the region, as a result the opportunities it presents cannot be fully harnessed. The green economy is a critical vehicle for achieving sustainable development, and unless it is well understood in that context, mainstreaming it into the different sectors will be difficult. Our capacity building programme aims to support emerging leaders, policy makers and business leaders from a wide range of sectors to build their competence on the green economy, and help them realise their dreams of a sustainable future.

This highly bespoke training programme will seek to address knowledge gaps in the green economy in Africa that have been identified by entities such as the UNEP, the World Economic Forum and South Africa’s National Planning Commission.

An online e-training programme, will provide a highly customised training programme on the concept, application and mechanisms for the green economy. The e-training will target decision-makers, business leaders and individual changemakers.
We also undertake an aggressive grassroots capacity building to promote a bottom up approach to the application of the concept of a green economy, and help build resilient communities.The capacity building programme will also be used to initiate a process of dialogue with a specific focus on how to bolster rural economies through the creation of business opportunities and improving access to markets for small scale farmers in selected areas in the region.

Social Dimensions for Green Growth

Green growth has emerged as an important concept for promoting economic models that are environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive. Many developing countries have recognised the benefits of green growth and have incorporated strategies into their development plans. However, the focus has mostly been on the economic and environmental aspects, with less attention given to the social dimensions of green growth.

Climate Smart Agriculture

Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) seeks to increase productivity, strengthen farmers’ resilience to climate change, and reduce agriculture’s contribution to climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing carbon storage on farmland. Climate-smart agriculture includes proven practical techniques — such as mulching, intercropping, conservation agriculture, crop rotation, integrated crop-livestock management, agroforestry, improved grazing, and improved water management — but also innovative practices such as better weather forecasting, early warning systems and risk insurance.

Energy Literacy

Energy Literacy can be described as understanding the role that energy plays in our every day lives, and using that knowledge to make informed decisions and for planning purposes. An important aspect of energy literacy is the fact that information is made available for key decision-makers as well as consumers to better navigate the complex array of issues in the energy value chain.

Green Entrepreneurship

Green growth has emerged as an important concept for promoting economic models that are environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive. Many developing countries have recognised the benefits of green growth and have incorporated strategies into their development plans. However, the focus has mostly been on the economic and environmental aspects, with less attention given to the social dimensions of green growth.

RESEARCH AND ADVOCACY

We are seeking to establish ourselves as a knowledge hub on the green economy, by undertaking high quality research and disseminating our outputs in the most accessible way possible to bridge the gap between academia and policy makers, business and the general public.

Our research outputs will comprise of:

Working papers- that provide a detailed analysis of GE issues related to resource scarcity in the region, as a contribution to intellectual capital development.

Policy briefs- short non-technical papers targeting high-level policy makers with a specific focus on the water-energy-food security and climate mega nexus.​

Newsletters- published weekly on our website to report on the latest developments on GE issues relevant to the region.

Mapping the financial and institutional landscape for a green economy

Many developing countries have made significant commitments towards the transition to a green economy, with significant resources allocated to that effect. Recently the South African government, through the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) established the Green Fund (GF), as a catalytic fund to support green economy projects and initiatives in South Africa. We are currently assisting the bank to develop a comprehensive understanding of the green economy financial and institutional landscape in South Africa, to enable the fund streamline its operations and leverage existing resources.

Low carbon development strategies for Zambia

We recently completed an assessment of the agricultural futures of the country as part of the USAID’s initiative on Low Emission Development Strategy (LEDS), in partnership with International Food Policy Research Institute (www.ifpri.org) and Development Data, a local organisation. The project focused on assessing the cost of accessing markets by farmers of major agricultural produce including maize, soybeans, wheat etc.

Africa Interact: Enabling research-to-policy dialogue for adaptation to climate change in Africa

There is evidence that Southern Africa is experiencing significant impacts on human health from incidences of drought and flooding. With support from CORAF/WECARD, this project undertook a comprehensive review of climate change adaptation research and policy in relation to human health in Southern Africa, with a goal of facilitating the communication and transfer of information between researchers and policymakers in the region. The assessment established that major knowledge gaps still exist in our understanding of the links between climate change and human health in the region, and its impact on agricultural productivity specifically.

FEATURED PROJECTS

Green innovations for socio-economic development

Water scarcity and availability poses major risk to socio-economic development and the environment. To the private sector, water scarcity translates directly into a reputational, regulatory, and financial risk, with major implications on their operations and supply chains. As a result, many companies have started to adopted innovations to manage their water risks. However, there is little understanding on the efficacy of such interventions, and whether the benefits of better water management extend beyond the specific business operations. This project is exploring the nature of green innovations that have been taken up by the private sector, and the extend to which they benefit the broader landscape as a whole.

Mapping the financial and institutional landscape for a green economy

Many developing countries have made significant commitments towards the transition to a green economy, with significant resources allocated to that effect. Recently the South African government, through the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) established the Green Fund (GF), as a catalytic fund to support green economy projects and initiatives in South Africa. We are currently assisting the bank to develop a comprehensive understanding of the green economy financial and institutional landscape in South Africa, to enable the fund streamline its operations and leverage existing resources.

Low carbon development strategies for Zambia

We recently completed an assessment of the agricultural futures of the country as part of the USAID’s initiative on Low Emission Development Strategy (LEDS), in partnership with International Food Policy Research Institute (www.ifpri.org) and Development Data, a local organisation. The project focused on assessing the cost of accessing markets by farmers of major agricultural produce including maize, soybeans, wheat etc.

Green business incubation and capacity building

Africege is currently piloting a green business incubation programme with the goal of activating grassroots green economy enterprises. This project is currently being implemented in Cape Town, with support from the DOEN Foundation and the New Economics Foundation. During the course of the next two years, 20 green enterprises will be supported both throung in-kind and financial support. The initiative is focused on supporting green enterprises that ascribe to new economy principles, that include innovative ownership arrangements, new forms of distribution and a focus on grassroots.

Africa Interact: Enabling research-to-policy dialogue for adaptation to climate change in Africa

There is evidence that Southern Africa is experiencing significant impacts on human health from incidences of drought and flooding. With support from CORAF/WECARD, this project undertook a comprehensive review of climate change adaptation research and policy in relation to human health in Southern Africa, with a goal of facilitating the communication and transfer of information between researchers and policymakers in the region. The assessment established that major knowledge gaps still exist in our understanding of the links between climate change and human health in the region, and its impact on agricultural productivity specifically.

Sustainable energy solutions for low cost housing

As part of our innovation hub, we are piloting a scheme that promotes sustainable energy solutions for low cost housing schemes in South Africa. We have established a workshop that trains local community members to manufacture and install tubular skylight units. Our goal is to install 1000 skylight units per annum, in low cost housing in South Africa to enable impoverished households to enjoy the benefits of natural lighting. We are currently seeking private sector support to sponsor the skylight units to enable us reach more households in South Africa. In future this programme will expand to other sustainable energy solutions that complement the day lighting solution that we offer.

TRAINING PROGRAMMES

We look forward to working and learning with you.

Social Dimensions for Green Growth


Green growth has emerged as an important concept for promoting economic models that are environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive. Many developing countries have recognised the benefits of green growth and have incorporated strategies into their development plans. However, the focus has mostly been on the economic and environmental aspects, with less attention given to the social dimensions of green growth.

Climate Smart Agriculture


Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) seeks to increase productivity, strengthen farmers’ resilience to climate change, and reduce agriculture’s contribution to climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing carbon storage on farmland. Climate-smart agriculture includes proven practical techniques — such as mulching, intercropping, conservation agriculture, crop rotation, integrated crop-livestock management, agroforestry, improved grazing, and improved water management — but also innovative practices such as better weather forecasting, early warning systems and risk insurance.

Energy Literacy


Energy Literacy can be described as understanding the role that energy plays in our every day lives, and using that knowledge to make informed decisions and for planning purposes. An important aspect of energy literacy is the fact that information is made available for key decision-makers as well as consumers to better navigate the complex array of issues in the energy value chain.

Green Entrepreneurship


The transition to a green economy offers a range of new opportunities that promote sustainable and inclusive economic development. However, to harness these opportunities requires significant skills development. Building understanding on the opportunities presented by the green economy and developing the right skills to exploit those opportunities is critical to the transition. Our green entrepreneurship programme seeks to close this gap, by offering training opportunities to emerging green entrepreneurs.

SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF GREEN GROWTH

Training Workshop, 20th February

WHAT

2-day training to learn about approaches and tools for green growth strategies.

WHY

Because the world needs realistic economic models that are environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive.

HOW

Seminars, small group discussions and lectures by international and institutionally anchored experts.
Where: Venue: Johannesburg (venue TBC)
When: 20th February 2015
Cost: R4200, including meals.
Hosted and facilitated by the African Centre for A Green Economy (Africege) and the World Centre for Sustainable Development (Rio+ Centre).

Course Background

Green growth has emerged as an important concept for promoting economic models that are environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive. Many developing countries have recognised the benefits of green growth and have incorporated strategies into their development plans. However, the focus has mostly been on the economic and environmental aspects, with less attention given to the social dimensions of green growth – as highlighted at the Rio+ 20 Summit on Sustainable Development in 2012.

The African Centre for Green Economy (Africege) has partnered with the World Centre for Sustainable Development (Rio+ Centre) to develop a course on the social dimensions of green growth. The course aims to build understanding on the measures for promoting social inclusion in green growth and how key sectors can make the transition. Drawing from South-South experience, participants will be enriched from interactions with policymakers, business leaders and green innovators.

This course is unique from other green growth training programmes. It is specifically designed with a strong focus on equity and social justice – topics that are often neglected in the green growth discourse.

For whom?

This course benefits those who want to develop understanding on the concept of a social and equitable green economy. It is useful for you if you want to identify ways to integrate its principles into your work plans, strategies and more. It is valuable across participants from the public, private and civil society sector:
Sustainability leaders and enterprise risk managers from the private sector Public sector officials at national, provincial and local governments Members of regional groupings, e.g. SADC, COMESA

Learing Objectives

This course builds understanding on the tools and approaches to achieve social outcomes in green growth. On completion of the training, participants will be conversant with the challenges of greening key sectors of the economy, equipped with tools for developing and incorporating green growth strategies and their respective organisations and mandates.

Methodology

The course is delivered through a mix of seminars, small group discussions and lectures. Participants benefit from the experience and knowledge of various relevant local and international institutions. The course materials draw from a wide range of latest literature on green growth that have been published by UNEP, GGKN, World Bank and more.

Course Content and Structure

The training is structured into 2 key modules, each divided into lessons with specific learning outcomes.
Learning materials will be given to participants in electronic form for future references.

Module 1: Introduction to Green Growth

What is green growth?
Greening key sectors of the economy
Green growth best practices

Module 2: Social Dimensions of Green Growth

Addressing the challenges of inequality
Strengthening social policies for a fair Green Growth
Enabling active citizenry
Gender dimensions to Green Growth

Cost and Registration

The cost of the training is R4,200, including day meals. Participants are responsible for making own flight arrangements and hotel accommodation for the duration of the training.

Please contact info@africege for the application form and additional information. There are limited places available, so reservation will be on a first come, first serve basis.

Course Facilitators

Ms Leisa Perch
Policy Specialist. World Centre for Sustainable Development (Rio+ Centre), Brazil.
Ms Perch is an international Development Professional with 15+ years experience in climate change, poverty reduction and gender equality. She has worked extensively in the Caribbean region and on Small Island Developing States. In Africa, she has worked with the SADC Parliamentary Forum and FANRPAN on green growth capacity development, establishing communities of practice. She also collaborates with the African Centre on Gender to mainstream gender into climate change policies and vie versa.
Ms Perch is a lead author of chapter 13 on poverty, livelihoods and climate change on the forthcoming Intergovernmental panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. She holds an MA from the University of Nottingham and a BA from Keele University.


Dr Mao Amis
Executive Director.African Centre fro a Green Economy (Africege), South Africa.
Dr Amis is the co-founder and Executive Director of the African Centre for a Green Economy (Africege), a non-profit think thank and capacity building organisation based in South Africa. Prior to founding Africege, Dr. Amis worked as programme Manager for WWF South Africa, and as strategy consultant on water and climate change. Dr Amis has extensive experience on Green Growth issues in Africa and has consulted and collaborated with various organisations such as IFPRI, the New Economics Foundation (NEF), CORAF, and others. He is currently leading a project to establish the first new economy innovation hub in South Africa, in partnership with NEF and DOEN.

Dr Amis holds a MSc and PhD in Natural Resource Management from the University of Cape Town. He is a task force member of the UN CEO Water Mandate, and the Western Cape Province Green Economy Working Group.


CONTACT US
Telephone: +27 (0) 21 713 4390
Email: info@africege.org

Physical Address
South Africa office
Suit 5B, Block B, Tokai Village Centre
Cnr Vans & Tokai Road
Tokai, Cape Town, 7945

Postal Address
P.o. Box 30178, Tokai 7966
Cape Town, South Africa